Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introduction to Psychology
AS.200.101 (01)

Do we all see colors the same way? How did so many 'good' people support the Nazi party? Do crossword puzzles really stave off Alzheimer's Disease? This course tries to answer these questions and many others, providing a comprehensive overview of the scientific study of the mind. We'll explore topics such as perception, language, memory, decision-making, creativity, love, sex, art, politics, religion, dreams, drugs, brain damage and mental illness, grappling with deep and long-standing controversies along the way: differences between the sexes, the relationship between mind and brain, causes and consequences of racism, human uniqueness (or not) within the animal kingdom, nature vs. nurture, good and evil, consciousness. Appropriate for anyone wanting to know who and what we are as human beings (or who noticed that psychology is now on the MCAT).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Firestone, Charles Z.
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/470
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Social Psychology
AS.200.133 (01)

An introductory survey of social psychology. Topics include social perception, social cognition, attitudes, prejudice, attraction, social influence, altruism, aggression, and group behavior.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Drigotas, Stephen M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/225
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods in Psychology
AS.200.200 (04)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 2:00PM - 3:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Illusions, delusions, and other confusions
AS.200.161 (01)

This course is suitable for all, but would be especially useful for a student who does not expect to take many (or any) additional psychology or cognitive science courses. We will explore what modern psychology has uncovered about how our intuitions concerning human nature deceive us. Freshmen Only. Note: This course does not count towards the Psychology major.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Egeth, Howard E
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods in Psychology
AS.200.200 (05)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 10:00AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Developmental Psychology
AS.200.132 (01)

An introductory survey of human development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The developing child is examined in terms of cognitive, social, emotional, motor, and language development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Feigenson, Lisa
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/100
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY

Foundations of Brain, Behavior and Cognition
AS.200.141 (01)

A survey of neuropsychology relating the organization of behavior to the integrative action of the nervous system. Cross-listed with Behavioral Biology and Neuroscience.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Smith, Dani R
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/150
  • PosTag(s): COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY

Research Methods in Psychology
AS.200.200 (01)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods in Psychology
AS.200.200 (03)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 2:00PM - 3:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods in Psychology
AS.200.200 (06)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 10:00AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
AS.200.321 (01)

This course focuses on mental disorders in children and adolescents. The course begins with an exploration of the general models and theories for why psychopathology occurs in childhood. The second portion of the course provides a systematic review of the symptoms, course, risk factors, theories, and treatments for specific disorders, including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, autism, ADHD, eating disorders, and behavioral disorders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Papadakis, Alison Moog Aubrecht
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/42
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Research Methods in Psychology
AS.200.200 (02)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Models of Mind and Brain
AS.200.313 (01)

This is a seminar surveying computational approaches to understanding mental and neural processes, including sensory and conceptual representation, categorization, learning and memory. The course will also develop familiarity with computational tools such as numerical simulation, linear transformation and data visualization. Recommended Course Background: AS.110.106 / Calculus I OR AS.110.108 Calculus I, AS.050.101 / Cognition OR AS.200.211 / Sensation & Perception OR AS.080.105 / Introduction to Neuroscience OR other introductory coursework in cognitive & neural sciences. Experience with at least one programming language is strongly recommended.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Honey, Christopher
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG

How Does the Brain Predict the Future?
AS.200.335 (01)

"Have you ever wondered how you predict the beat will drop in a song or that a traffic light will change? A combination of evolution and experience have wired your brain to generate predictions about the future. In this course, you will learn about the factors which influence neural predictions. Understanding how the brain forms predictions is critical to understanding perception, movement, music, language, and cognition. Some examples include: hallucinations, how we walk, why we like pop music, how we converse, and how we make plans. We will read news articles and original research to strengthen scientific literacy and critical thinking. The content of our readings will encompass a variety of research methods (including behavioral assessment, fMRI, single electrode recordings, EEG, and ECoG). We will discuss key factors in neural predictions, such as: predictive domain (what is the objective of the prediction and where does it occur in the brain?), specificity (is the prediction very detailed or general?), timescale (when is something predicted to occur?), statistics (how probable is the predicted outcome?), consciousness (do you explicitly or implicitly know the prediction?), and reward (how much reward is associated with the predicted outcome?). Finally, we will talk about general theories of prediction, including predictive coding and Bayesian inference."

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Himberger, Kevin David
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM, COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, BEHB-BIOBEH

Forensic Psychology
AS.200.202 (01)

The field of forensic psychology is focused on answering legal questions about the causes of human behavior. This survey course will explore the work that forensic psychologists do; their research, assessment, and clinical methods; and how their work influences lawyers, judges, and other legal practitioners. Specific topics will include mental capacity assessment, psychopathy, claims of mental distress, child custody evaluations, juvenile delinquency, forensic treatment, and forensic neuropsychological assessments.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 5:00PM - 7:20PM
  • Instructor: Howe, Chelsea Jillian
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/100
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Neurobiology of Human Cognition
AS.200.380 (01)

The complexity of human behavior surpasses even our closest primate relatives. Only humans communicate through language, build complex technology, devise legal system and wage war. What neurobiological capacities set humans apart from other animals? This course will explore the neurobiology of cognition, focusing on cognitive domains that are particularly developed in the human species: language, social cognition, number, executive function and concepts. The course format will consist of lectures and in class workshops.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bedny, Marina
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM, NEUR-CG, COGS-NEURO, BEHB-BIOBEH

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (02)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:20PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Animal Behavior
AS.200.208 (01)

Examines basic principles of animal behavior (orientation, migration, communication, reproduction, parent-offspring relations, ontogeny of behavior and social organization). Evolution and adaptive significance of behavior will be emphasized.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Porth-Bohn, Kirsten M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 19/70
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History Of Psychology
AS.200.301 (01)

A survey of leading figures, schools, and systems in the history of psychology. The course will emphasize the development of experimental psychology in late 19th century Germany and its establishment in America at Johns Hopkins, Harvard, Chicago, and Columbia. Special topics will include the development of clinical and applied psychology and psychological testing. Enrollment limited to Juniors and Seniors only. Sophomores with instructor approval. Recommended Course Background: two prior Psychology courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 6:50PM
  • Instructor: Hofer, Paul Jeffrey
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Positive Psychology
AS.200.222 (01)

The course will review the growing field of positive psychology and will review the research on positive human attributes such as optimism, happiness, hope, resiliency, self-esteem, altruism, empathy, and forgiveness. This course will explore the research on how such positive attributes are developed and how they relate to psychological and physical well-being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Halberda, Justin
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/60
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Human Memory Psychology
AS.200.334 (01)

This class will survey the behavioral and biological science of human memory. Historical perspectives as well as modern controversies will be discussed. Intersections with other fields such as law, education, medicine, and technology will be highlighted. The course will be a mixture of lectures and group discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Janice
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/24
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM, BEHB-BIOBEH, NEUR-ST

Research Methods in Psychology
AS.200.200 (07)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 4:00PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (01)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/20
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Clinical Neuropsychology
AS.200.322 (01)

Clinical Neuropsychology is a clinical psychology specialty focused on assessment and treatment of acquired or developmental disorders of the nervous system, including dementia, neurodegenerative disorders, traumatic brain injury, learning disabilities, and neurodevelopment disorders. This course will focus on research findings and techniques used by psychologists in the assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation processes. Recommended Course Background: AS.200.141 / Foundations of Brain Behavior Cognition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 5:00PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Rickards, Tyler Alan
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, BEHB-BIOBEH, NEUR-ST

Advanced Social Psychology
AS.200.333 (01)

The class is designed as a seminar including discussion of primary readings of social psychology articles ranging in topics from interpersonal relationship to behavior in large groups. Rising junior & senior Psychology majors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Drigotas, Stephen M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI, PSYC-SEM

Models of Psychotherapy
AS.200.382 (01)

This course reviews the major models of psychotherapy, including psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, interpersonal, and family therapy, with a focus on modern and empirically supported treatments. The application of the models through the analysis of clinical case studies is emphasized. Restricted to Junior & Senior Psychology Majors & Minors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Papadakis, Alison Moog Aubrecht
  • Room:  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI, PSYC-SEM

Neuropsychopharmacology
AS.200.376 (01)

Designed to provide information about how drugs affect the brain and behavior. The course focuses on biological concepts underlying structures and functions of the brain that relate to mental disorders. An introduction to neurobiology and brain function is presented as it applies to the interaction of various classes of drugs with the individual neurotransmitter systems in the brain. A brief historic review is followed by a discussion of clinical relevance. Cross-listed with Behavioral Biology and Neuroscience. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Sterbing-d'angelo, Susanne
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/61
  • PosTag(s): COGS-NEURO, NEUR-CM, NEUR-ST, BEHB-BIOBEH, BIOL-UL

Industrial and Organizational Psychology
AS.200.240 (01)

This course provides a survey of the field of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, a scientific discipline that studies human behavior in the workplace. The course focuses on understanding the psychological bases of work behaviors, cognitions, and emotions and practices that can be implemented to create a good fit between employees' characteristics and work demands. A number of topics are addressed in the scientist-practitioner model, including the structure/characteristics of jobs, techniques for assessing and supporting employee performance, selecting and training a workforce, and the various mechanisms that influence employee motivation and attitudes, among other topics. Real-world applications and research are emphasized throughout the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Roberts Fox, Heather
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/60
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.200.101 (01)Introduction to PsychologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMFirestone, Charles Z. COGS-COGPSY, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.200.133 (01)Introduction to Social PsychologyDrigotas, Stephen M 
AS.200.200 (04)Research Methods in PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 2:00PM - 3:45PMBowen, Jeffrey D 
AS.200.161 (01)Illusions, delusions, and other confusionsT 2:00PM - 2:50PMEgeth, Howard E 
AS.200.200 (05)Research Methods in PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 10:00AM - 11:45AMBowen, Jeffrey D 
AS.200.132 (01)Introduction to Developmental PsychologyMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMFeigenson, Lisa COGS-COGPSY
AS.200.141 (01)Foundations of Brain, Behavior and CognitionTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSmith, Dani R COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY
AS.200.200 (01)Research Methods in PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:45PMBowen, Jeffrey D 
AS.200.200 (03)Research Methods in PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 2:00PM - 3:45PMBowen, Jeffrey D 
AS.200.200 (06)Research Methods in PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 10:00AM - 11:45AMBowen, Jeffrey D 
AS.200.321 (01)Child and Adolescent PsychopathologyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPapadakis, Alison Moog Aubrecht BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.200 (02)Research Methods in PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:45PMBowen, Jeffrey D 
AS.200.313 (01)Models of Mind and BrainMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMHoney, Christopher NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, COGS-COMPCG
AS.200.335 (01)How Does the Brain Predict the Future?TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHimberger, Kevin David PSYC-SEM, COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.200.202 (01)Forensic PsychologyT 5:00PM - 7:20PMHowe, Chelsea Jillian 
AS.200.380 (01)Neurobiology of Human CognitionT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBedny, Marina PSYC-SEM, NEUR-CG, COGS-NEURO, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.200.204 (02)Human SexualityW 4:00PM - 6:20PMKraft, Chris S BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.208 (01)Animal BehaviorTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMPorth-Bohn, Kirsten M 
AS.200.301 (01)History Of PsychologyTh 4:30PM - 6:50PMHofer, Paul Jeffrey 
AS.200.222 (01)Positive PsychologyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHalberda, Justin BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.334 (01)Human Memory PsychologyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMChen, Janice PSYC-SEM, BEHB-BIOBEH, NEUR-ST
AS.200.200 (07)Research Methods in PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 4:00PM - 5:45PMBowen, Jeffrey D 
AS.200.204 (01)Human SexualityW 1:30PM - 3:50PMKraft, Chris S BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.322 (01)Clinical NeuropsychologyT 5:00PM - 7:30PMRickards, Tyler Alan COGS-COGPSY, BEHB-BIOBEH, NEUR-ST
AS.200.333 (01)Advanced Social PsychologyW 1:30PM - 3:50PMDrigotas, Stephen M BEHB-SOCSCI, PSYC-SEM
AS.200.382 (01)Models of PsychotherapyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPapadakis, Alison Moog Aubrecht BEHB-SOCSCI, PSYC-SEM
AS.200.376 (01)NeuropsychopharmacologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSterbing-d'angelo, Susanne COGS-NEURO, NEUR-CM, NEUR-ST, BEHB-BIOBEH, BIOL-UL
AS.200.240 (01)Industrial and Organizational PsychologyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMRoberts Fox, Heather