Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Research Methods in Experimental Psychology
AS.200.200 (03)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Social Psychology
AS.200.133 (01)

An introductory survey of social psychology. Topics include social perception, social cognition, attitudes, prejudice, attraction, social influence, altruism, aggression, and group behavior.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Drigotas, Stephen M
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 42/225
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Psychology
AS.200.101 (01)

Do we all see colors the same way? How did so many 'good' people support the Nazi party? Do crossword puzzles really stave off Alzheimer's Disease? This course tries to answer these questions and many others, providing a comprehensive overview of the scientific study of the mind. We'll explore topics such as perception, language, memory, decision-making, creativity, love, sex, art, politics, religion, dreams, drugs, brain damage and mental illness, grappling with deep and long-standing controversies along the way: differences between the sexes, the relationship between mind and brain, causes and consequences of racism, human uniqueness (or not) within the animal kingdom, nature vs. nurture, good and evil, consciousness. Appropriate for anyone wanting to know who and what we are as human beings (or who noticed that psychology is now on the MCAT).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Firestone, Charles Z.
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/469
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Developmental Psychology
AS.200.132 (01)

An introductory survey of human development from the prenatal period through adolescence. The developing child is examined in terms of cognitive, social, emotional, motor, and language development.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 10:00AM - 10:50AM
  • Instructor: Feigenson, Lisa
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/100
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY

Illusions, delusions, and other confusions
AS.200.161 (01)

This course is suitable for all, but would be especially useful for a student who does not expect to take many (or any) additional psychology or cognitive science courses. We will explore what modern psychology has uncovered about how our intuitions concerning human nature deceive us. Freshmen Only. Note: This course does not count towards the Psychology major.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Egeth, Howard E
  • Room: Ames 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods in Experimental Psychology
AS.200.200 (01)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods in Experimental Psychology
AS.200.200 (02)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods in Experimental Psychology
AS.200.200 (05)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Foundations of Brain, Behavior and Cognition
AS.200.141 (01)

A survey of neuropsychology relating the organization of behavior to the integrative action of the nervous system. Cross-listed with Behavioral Biology and Neuroscience.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Smith, Dani R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 108/320
  • PosTag(s): COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY

Research Methods in Experimental Psychology
AS.200.200 (04)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods in Experimental Psychology
AS.200.200 (07)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 5:00PM - 6:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Animal Behavior
AS.200.208 (01)

Examines basic principles of animal behavior (orientation, migration, communication, reproduction, parent-offspring relations, ontogeny of behavior and social organization). Evolution and adaptive significance of behavior will be emphasized.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Porth-Bohn, Kirsten M
  • Room: Mergenthaler 111
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 25/70
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Methods in Experimental Psychology
AS.200.200 (06)

The goal of this course is to introduce how psychological scientists develop and test research questions about the mind and behavior. We will explore how empirical investigation differs from other ways of making discoveries and learning about the world, and how psychologists employ various methodologies to tackle their phenomena of interest. We will examine the relationships between research questions and research designs, the benefits and drawbacks of differing measurement and sampling approaches, the ethical implications of various research paradigms, and best practices in communicating research findings clearly and engagingly. You will have the opportunity to engage “hands-on” with the research process through interactive labs and demonstrations. Over the course of the semester, you will develop and receive feedback on a research proposal, which will serve as a foundation for the spring course “Design and Analysis for Experimental Psychology”.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 1:00PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Bloomberg 272
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Positive Psychology
AS.200.222 (01)

The course will review the growing field of positive psychology and will review the research on positive human attributes such as optimism, happiness, hope, resiliency, self-esteem, altruism, empathy, and forgiveness. This course will explore the research on how such positive attributes are developed and how they relate to psychological and physical well-being.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Halberda, Justin
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/60
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Abnormal Psychology
AS.200.212 (01)

A survey of the major syndromes of psychological disorders. Research and theory about the mechanisms, development, and diagnosis of psychopathology are emphasized.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Papadakis, Alison Moog Aubrecht
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/200
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Personality
AS.200.209 (01)

This is a survey course focused on theory and research on human personality. Topics include personality traits, motivation, unconscious processes, self-regulation, cognitive and behavioral aspects of personality, biological and evolutionary influences on personality, and dysfunctional manifestations of personality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Howe, Chelsea Jillian
  • Room: Remsen Hall 1
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/50
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Industrial and Organizational Psychology
AS.200.240 (01)

This course provides a survey of the field of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, a scientific discipline that studies human behavior in the workplace. The course focuses on understanding the psychological bases of work behaviors, cognitions, and emotions and practices that can be implemented to create a good fit between employees’ characteristics and work demands. A number of topics are addressed in the scientist-practitioner model, including the structure/characteristics of jobs, techniques for assessing and supporting employee performance, selecting and training a workforce, and the various mechanisms that influence employee motivation and attitudes, among other topics. Real-world applications and research are emphasized throughout the course.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Roberts Fox, Heather
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/60
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sensation & Perception
AS.200.211 (01)

This course surveys how stimuli from the environment are transformed into neural signals, and how the brain processes those signals to interpret the objects and events in the world. A primary focus will be on the visual system, with additional coverage of hearing, touch, taste, and smell.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Fischer, Jason
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/70
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-NEURO

Advanced Social Psychology
AS.200.333 (01)

The class is designed as a seminar including discussion of primary readings of social psychology articles ranging in topics from interpersonal relationship to behavior in large groups. Rising junior & senior Psychology majors only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Drigotas, Stephen M
  • Room: Ames 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/19
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI, PSYC-SEM

Human Memory Psychology
AS.200.334 (01)

This class will survey the behavioral and biological science of human memory. Historical perspectives as well as modern controversies will be discussed. Intersections with other fields such as law, education, medicine, and technology will be highlighted. The course will be a mixture of lectures and group discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Chen, Janice
  • Room: Ames 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM, BEHB-BIOBEH, NEUR-ST

Law, Psychology and Public Policy
AS.200.326 (01)

An introduction to applications of psychological research in policy analysis. Special emphasis is given to the use and misuse of psychology in Supreme Court advocacy and decision making in the areas of children’s rights, adult sexuality, and educational and employment opportunity. Recommended Course Background: Statistics & Regression Analysis

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 6:50PM
  • Instructor: Hofer, Paul Jeffrey
  • Room: Ames 217
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM

Neurobiology of Human Cognition
AS.200.380 (01)

The complexity of human behavior surpasses even our closest primate relatives. Only humans communicate through language, build complex technology, devise legal system and wage war. What neurobiological capacities set humans apart from other animals? This course will explore the neurobiology of cognition, focusing on cognitive domains that are particularly developed in the human species: language, social cognition, number, executive function and concepts. The course format will consist of lectures and in class workshops.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bedny, Marina
  • Room: Latrobe 120
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/19
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM, NEUR-CG, COGS-NEURO, BEHB-BIOBEH

Tests & Measurements
AS.200.361 (01)

Psychological tests and measures are used in several settings including research, clinical, business, forensic, school and other applied settings. This course will consider the methodological and practical issues involved in test construction, the evaluation of instruments, and the uses of psychological tests across settings and for different purposes. Examples of assessments that may be discussed are aptitude and achievement tests; personality and behavioral inventories; neuropsychological tests, observations and interviews; and tests for employment and forensic use. Enrollment limited to Junior & Senior Cognitive Science & Psychology Majors, or instructor approval.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Ostrander, Rick
  • Room: Krieger 306
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

How Does the Brain Predict the Future?
AS.200.335 (01)

"Have you ever wondered how you predict the beat will drop in a song or that a traffic light will change? A combination of evolution and experience have wired your brain to generate predictions about the future. In this course, you will learn about the factors which influence neural predictions. Understanding how the brain forms predictions is critical to understanding perception, movement, music, language, and cognition. Some examples include: hallucinations, how we walk, why we like pop music, how we converse, and how we make plans. We will read news articles and original research to strengthen scientific literacy and critical thinking. The content of our readings will encompass a variety of research methods (including behavioral assessment, fMRI, single electrode recordings, EEG, and ECoG). We will discuss key factors in neural predictions, such as: predictive domain (what is the objective of the prediction and where does it occur in the brain?), specificity (is the prediction very detailed or general?), timescale (when is something predicted to occur?), statistics (how probable is the predicted outcome?), consciousness (do you explicitly or implicitly know the prediction?), and reward (how much reward is associated with the predicted outcome?). Finally, we will talk about general theories of prediction, including predictive coding and Bayesian inference."

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Himberger, Kevin David
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/18
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM, COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, BEHB-BIOBEH

Models of Psychotherapy
AS.200.382 (01)

This course reviews the major models of psychotherapy, including psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, interpersonal, and family therapy, with a focus on modern and empirically supported treatments. The application of the models through the analysis of clinical case studies is emphasized. Restricted to Junior & Senior Psychology Majors & Minors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Papadakis, Alison Moog Aubrecht
  • Room: Bloomberg 172
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-CG, BEHB-SOCSCI, PSYC-SEM

Forensic Psychology
AS.200.202 (01)

The field of forensic psychology is focused on answering legal questions about the causes of human behavior. This survey course will explore the work that forensic psychologists do; their research, assessment, and clinical methods; and how their work influences lawyers, judges, and other legal practitioners. Specific topics will include mental capacity assessment, psychopathy, claims of mental distress, child custody evaluations, juvenile delinquency, forensic treatment, and forensic neuropsychological assessments.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:20PM
  • Instructor: Howe, Chelsea Jillian
  • Room: Remsen Hall 101
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/100
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Neuropsychopharmacology
AS.200.376 (01)

Designed to provide information about how drugs affect the brain and behavior. The course focuses on biological concepts underlying structures and functions of the brain that relate to mental disorders. An introduction to neurobiology and brain function is presented as it applies to the interaction of various classes of drugs with the individual neurotransmitter systems in the brain. A brief historic review is followed by a discussion of clinical relevance. Cross-listed with Behavioral Biology and Neuroscience. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Sterbing-d'angelo, Susanne
  • Room: Gilman 50
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/50
  • PosTag(s): COGS-NEURO, NEUR-CM, NEUR-ST, BEHB-BIOBEH, BIOL-UL

Clinical Neuropsychology
AS.200.322 (01)

Clinical Neuropsychology is a clinical psychology specialty focused on assessment and treatment of acquired or developmental disorders of the nervous system, including dementia, neurodegenerative disorders, traumatic brain injury, learning disabilities, and neurodevelopment disorders. This course will focus on research findings and techniques used by psychologists in the assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation processes. Recommended Course Background: AS.200.141 / Foundations of Brain Behavior Cognition.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 5:00PM - 7:20PM
  • Instructor: Rickards, Tyler Alan
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/25
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY

Human Sexual Orientation
AS.290.420 (01)

This course will examine the historical and current theories of sexual orientation and sexual variation development by examining the biological, psychological and social contributing factors that influence the development of sexual orientations and variations along with treatment and modification of problematic sexual behaviors. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Students may enroll in both AS.200.204 and AS.290.420, but cannot do so in the same semester. Enrollment is limited to Senior Majors & Minors in Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychology; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 6:30PM - 8:50PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 2/30
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.200.200 (03)Research Methods in Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DBloomberg 272
AS.200.133 (01)Introduction to Social PsychologyMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDrigotas, Stephen MHodson 110
AS.200.101 (01)Introduction to PsychologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMFirestone, Charles Z.Hodson 110COGS-COGPSY, GECS-SOCSCI
AS.200.132 (01)Introduction to Developmental PsychologyMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMFeigenson, LisaGilman 50COGS-COGPSY
AS.200.161 (01)Illusions, delusions, and other confusionsT 2:00PM - 2:50PMEgeth, Howard EAmes 217
AS.200.200 (01)Research Methods in Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DBloomberg 272
AS.200.200 (02)Research Methods in Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DBloomberg 272
AS.200.200 (05)Research Methods in Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DBloomberg 272
AS.200.141 (01)Foundations of Brain, Behavior and CognitionTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSmith, Dani RMudd 26COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY
AS.200.200 (04)Research Methods in Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 3:00PM - 4:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DBloomberg 272
AS.200.200 (07)Research Methods in Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 5:00PM - 6:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DBloomberg 272
AS.200.208 (01)Animal BehaviorTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPorth-Bohn, Kirsten MMergenthaler 111
AS.200.200 (06)Research Methods in Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 1:00PM - 2:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DBloomberg 272
AS.200.222 (01)Positive PsychologyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHalberda, JustinAmes 234BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.212 (01)Abnormal PsychologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMPapadakis, Alison Moog AubrechtHodson 110
AS.200.209 (01)PersonalityT 1:30PM - 3:50PMHowe, Chelsea JillianRemsen Hall 1
AS.200.240 (01)Industrial and Organizational PsychologyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMRoberts Fox, HeatherAmes 234
AS.200.211 (01)Sensation & PerceptionTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMFischer, JasonKrieger 205COGS-COGPSY, BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-NEURO
AS.200.333 (01)Advanced Social PsychologyW 1:30PM - 3:50PMDrigotas, Stephen MAmes 217BEHB-SOCSCI, PSYC-SEM
AS.200.334 (01)Human Memory PsychologyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMChen, JaniceAmes 217PSYC-SEM, BEHB-BIOBEH, NEUR-ST
AS.200.326 (01)Law, Psychology and Public PolicyTh 4:30PM - 6:50PMHofer, Paul JeffreyAmes 217PSYC-SEM
AS.200.380 (01)Neurobiology of Human CognitionT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBedny, MarinaLatrobe 120PSYC-SEM, NEUR-CG, COGS-NEURO, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.200.361 (01)Tests & MeasurementsW 4:00PM - 6:30PMOstrander, RickKrieger 306
AS.200.335 (01)How Does the Brain Predict the Future?TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHimberger, Kevin DavidBloomberg 276PSYC-SEM, COGS-COGPSY, NEUR-CG, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.200.382 (01)Models of PsychotherapyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPapadakis, Alison Moog AubrechtBloomberg 172NEUR-CG, BEHB-SOCSCI, PSYC-SEM
AS.200.202 (01)Forensic PsychologyT 4:00PM - 6:20PMHowe, Chelsea JillianRemsen Hall 101
AS.200.376 (01)NeuropsychopharmacologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSterbing-d'angelo, SusanneGilman 50COGS-NEURO, NEUR-CM, NEUR-ST, BEHB-BIOBEH, BIOL-UL
AS.200.322 (01)Clinical NeuropsychologyT 5:00PM - 7:20PMRickards, Tyler AlanAmes 218COGS-COGPSY
AS.290.420 (01)Human Sexual OrientationW 6:30PM - 8:50PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218BEHB-SOCSCI

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Foundations of Brain, Behavior and Cognition
AS.200.141 (01)

A survey of neuropsychology relating the organization of behavior to the integrative action of the nervous system. Cross-listed with Behavioral Biology and Neuroscience.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Smith, Dani R
  • Room: Mudd 26
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 202/300
  • PosTag(s): COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY

Freshmen Seminar: Evolutionary Psychology
AS.200.159 (01)

In this course we discuss evolutionary psychology, which is the idea that the mind can be understood as an adaptation to our ancestral environment by means of natural selection. Freshmen only. Note: This course does not count towards the Psychology major.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 2:00PM - 2:50PM
  • Instructor: Egeth, Howard E
  • Room: Ames 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Cognitive Development
AS.050.339 (01)

This is a survey course in developmental psychology designed for individuals with some basic background in psychology or cognitive science, but little or none in development. The course is strongly theoretically oriented, with emphasis on issues of nature, and development psychology as well as relevant empirical evidence. The principle focus will be early development, i.e., from conception through middle childhood. The course is organized topically, covering biological and prenatal development, perceptual and cognitive development, the nature and development of intelligence, and language learning.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Yarmolinskaya, Julia S
  • Room: Krieger 300
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO

Language & Thought
AS.050.358 (01)

Have you ever wondered about the relationships between language and thought? Philosophers, linguists, psychologists, evolutionary theorists and cognitive scientists have too and this course will survey the current thinking on this matter. Classical papers such as those by Whorf and Sapir, more recent philosophical papers by people such as Fodor and Dennett, and recent empirical work by linguists and psycholingists on the relationship between language and thinking in development and in adults will be covered. Discussions will focus on the theoretically possible relationships between language and thought and the empirical data that speak to these. Juniors and seniors only. Freshmen and sophomores by permission of instructor only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Landau, Barbara
  • Room: Krieger 134A
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): COGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY

Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
AS.200.110 (01)

Introductory survey of current research and theory on topics in cognitive psychology. The course will cover a range of topics in perception, attention, learning, reasoning, and memory, emphasizing relationships among mind, brain, and behavior.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Flombaum, Jonathan
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 22/455
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY

Introduction to Social Psychology
AS.200.133 (01)

An introductory survey of social psychology. Topics include social perception, social cognition, attitudes, prejudice, attraction, social influence, altruism, aggression, and group behavior.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Drigotas, Stephen M
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 5/225
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Design & Analysis for Experimental Psychology
AS.200.201 (01)

The goal of this course is to expose you to the processes of data collection, analysis, and dissemination in psychology. This course is the follow-up to “Research Methods in Experimental Psychology,” and therefore will draw on the methodological principles and practices covered in the Fall semester. This course will cover a wide array of analytical techniques (i.e., statistics) that you will apply to data collected as part of a semester-long group research project. The course will also include extensive coverage of the R programming language for use in data management, analysis, and visualization. With your group members, you will collect primary research data, carry out appropriate statistical tests, compose individual research manuscripts, and collectively present a poster at an on-campus research symposium. In combination with the Fall course, this class will serve as strong preparation for those considering honors theses, joining research labs at Homewood and/or JHMI, conducting independent research projects, and ultimately pursuing careers/graduate work in experimental psychology.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Design & Analysis for Experimental Psychology
AS.200.201 (03)

The goal of this course is to expose you to the processes of data collection, analysis, and dissemination in psychology. This course is the follow-up to “Research Methods in Experimental Psychology,” and therefore will draw on the methodological principles and practices covered in the Fall semester. This course will cover a wide array of analytical techniques (i.e., statistics) that you will apply to data collected as part of a semester-long group research project. The course will also include extensive coverage of the R programming language for use in data management, analysis, and visualization. With your group members, you will collect primary research data, carry out appropriate statistical tests, compose individual research manuscripts, and collectively present a poster at an on-campus research symposium. In combination with the Fall course, this class will serve as strong preparation for those considering honors theses, joining research labs at Homewood and/or JHMI, conducting independent research projects, and ultimately pursuing careers/graduate work in experimental psychology.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 2:00PM - 3:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Design & Analysis for Experimental Psychology
AS.200.201 (02)

The goal of this course is to expose you to the processes of data collection, analysis, and dissemination in psychology. This course is the follow-up to “Research Methods in Experimental Psychology,” and therefore will draw on the methodological principles and practices covered in the Fall semester. This course will cover a wide array of analytical techniques (i.e., statistics) that you will apply to data collected as part of a semester-long group research project. The course will also include extensive coverage of the R programming language for use in data management, analysis, and visualization. With your group members, you will collect primary research data, carry out appropriate statistical tests, compose individual research manuscripts, and collectively present a poster at an on-campus research symposium. In combination with the Fall course, this class will serve as strong preparation for those considering honors theses, joining research labs at Homewood and/or JHMI, conducting independent research projects, and ultimately pursuing careers/graduate work in experimental psychology.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Neuroscience Learning and Memory
AS.080.304 (01)

This course is an advanced survey of the scientific study of learning and memory. Different perspectives will be used to review the science of learning and memory including the cellular-molecular basis of synaptic plasticity, the functional circuitry involved in learning and memory and memory systems in the brain. The course is designed to provide a deep understanding of the issues and current debates in learning and memory research and focuses specifically on animal models of memory and memory impairment. This is an interactive lecture course with a strong emphasis on student participation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 4:30PM - 5:45PM
  • Instructor: Bakker, Arnold
  • Room: Hodson 311
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/45
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-ST, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CM, BIOL-UL, COGS-NEURO, BEHB-BIOBEH

Design & Analysis for Experimental Psychology
AS.200.201 (04)

The goal of this course is to expose you to the processes of data collection, analysis, and dissemination in psychology. This course is the follow-up to “Research Methods in Experimental Psychology,” and therefore will draw on the methodological principles and practices covered in the Fall semester. This course will cover a wide array of analytical techniques (i.e., statistics) that you will apply to data collected as part of a semester-long group research project. The course will also include extensive coverage of the R programming language for use in data management, analysis, and visualization. With your group members, you will collect primary research data, carry out appropriate statistical tests, compose individual research manuscripts, and collectively present a poster at an on-campus research symposium. In combination with the Fall course, this class will serve as strong preparation for those considering honors theses, joining research labs at Homewood and/or JHMI, conducting independent research projects, and ultimately pursuing careers/graduate work in experimental psychology.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 2:00PM - 3:45PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Abnormal Psychology
AS.200.212 (01)

A survey of the major syndromes of psychological disorders. Research and theory about the mechanisms, development, and diagnosis of psychopathology are emphasized.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Papadakis, Alison Moog Aubrecht
  • Room: Hodson 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/200
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Advanced Seminar in Forensic Psychology
AS.200.305 (01)

Forensic psychologists determine clinical diagnoses and offer expert opinions to assist court decision makers who must employ legal tests to make case determinations. This course will explore how forensic psychologists communicate with the courts via consultation, report writing, and expert testimony. Students will write forensic analyses on a variety of controversial, cutting edge forensic topics (e.g., for competence to stand trial, child abuse, civil commitment, compensation for mental injuries, sex offender commitment, insanity, fitness for duty, child custody). Recommended background: AS.200.212

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:20PM
  • Instructor: Howe, Chelsea Jillian
  • Room: Ames 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM

History Of Psychology
AS.200.301 (01)

A survey of leading figures, schools, and systems in the history of psychology. The course will emphasize the development of experimental psychology in late 19th century Germany and its establishment in America at Johns Hopkins, Harvard, Chicago, and Columbia. Special topics will include the development of clinical and applied psychology and psychological testing. Enrollment limited to Juniors and Seniors only. Sophomores with instructor approval. Recommended Course Background: two prior Psychology courses.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 4:30PM - 7:00PM
  • Instructor: Hofer, Paul Jeffrey
  • Room: Ames 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM

Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
AS.200.321 (01)

This course focuses on mental disorders in children and adolescents. The course begins with an exploration of the general models and theories for why psychopathology occurs in childhood. The second portion of the course provides a systematic review of the symptoms, course, risk factors, theories, and treatments for specific disorders, including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, autism, ADHD, eating disorders, and behavioral disorders.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Papadakis, Alison Moog Aubrecht
  • Room: Krieger 180
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/40
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Neuroscience of Decision Making
AS.200.304 (01)

This course will survey the neural mechanisms of decision-making. Current experimental research and theory concerning selection, control, and evaluation of actions are examined in humans and animals. Topics will range from simple perceptual judgements to complex social behavior. The course involves a weekly lecture about a specific topic followed by a student presentation of a current research paper. Cross-listed with Neuroscience.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Stuphorn, Veit
  • Room: Bloomberg 276
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-ST, NEUR-CG, BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-NEURO, PSYC-SEM

Medical Psychology
AS.200.307 (01)

Medical Psychology is a specialization within clinical psychology that focuses on the application of psychological theories, research, and techniques to physical health problems and health promotion. Students will learn about the consultation process and interventions used in medical psychology practice to improve the physical and psychological health of medical patients, including those with chronic conditions (e.g., chronic pain, heart disease) and those with acute illnesses and injuries. Enrollment limited to Junior & Senior Psychology Majors or with instructor approval.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:20PM
  • Instructor: Ostrander, Rick
  • Room: Krieger 110
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): PSYC-SEM

Interpersonal Relations
AS.200.317 (01)

This course will investigate interpersonal processes ranging from attraction and courtship to relationship functioning and distress. Enrollment limited to Psychology majors, Psychology minors, and Behavioral Biology majors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Drigotas, Stephen M
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Design & Analysis for Experimental Psychology
AS.200.201 (05)

The goal of this course is to expose you to the processes of data collection, analysis, and dissemination in psychology. This course is the follow-up to “Research Methods in Experimental Psychology,” and therefore will draw on the methodological principles and practices covered in the Fall semester. This course will cover a wide array of analytical techniques (i.e., statistics) that you will apply to data collected as part of a semester-long group research project. The course will also include extensive coverage of the R programming language for use in data management, analysis, and visualization. With your group members, you will collect primary research data, carry out appropriate statistical tests, compose individual research manuscripts, and collectively present a poster at an on-campus research symposium. In combination with the Fall course, this class will serve as strong preparation for those considering honors theses, joining research labs at Homewood and/or JHMI, conducting independent research projects, and ultimately pursuing careers/graduate work in experimental psychology.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 10:00AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Human Sexuality
AS.200.204 (01)

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Open to Juniors & Seniors within the following majors/minors: Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychological & Brain Sciences; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/40
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Behavioral Endocrinology
AS.200.344 (01)

An examination of the effects of hormones on behavior in non-human and human animals. Topics will include the effects of hormones on sexual differentiation, reproductive behavior, parental behavior, homeostasis and biological rhythms, regulation of body weight, learning and memory. Cross-listed with Behavioral Biology and Neuroscience.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Porth-Bohn, Kirsten M
  • Room: Krieger 170
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/70
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-ST, NEUR-CM, BEHB-BIOBEH, BIOL-UL

Careers in Psychology -Freshman
AS.200.401 (01)

An introduction to the varied career paths offered across the field of psychology, hosting a diverse representation of speakers from various Johns Hopkins institutions and the local Baltimore community.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Roberts Fox, Heather
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Functional Human Neuroanatomy
AS.200.370 (01)

This course examines the general organizing principles of the anatomy of the human central nervous system and how this anatomical organization relates to function, from the level of neural circuits, to systems, to behavior. Students will learn to identify neuroanatomical structures and pathways in dissections and MRI images through computerized exercises. Readings and lectures will emphasize general structure-function relationships and an understanding of the functional roles of particular structures in sensory, motor, and cognitive systems.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Courtney-Faruqee, Susan
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 36/50
  • PosTag(s): COGS-NEURO, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST, BEHB-BIOBEH

Mind, Brain & Experience
AS.200.385 (01)

How do nature and nurture shape the human mind? How does experience contribute to the development of visual perception, language and social reasoning? This course explores insights into these age-old questions from neuroscience and psychology. Studies of infant behavior reveal rich knowledge about objects and people in the first months of life. At the same time, experience has profound effects on behavior and neurobiology. For example, temporary absence of vision (i.e. blindness) during development permanently alters visual perception and the visual cortex. Key evidence also comes from studies of naturally occurring variation in human experience (e.g. blindness, deafness, socioeconomic and cultural differences). We will discuss what such studies of cognitive and neural function tell us about the origins of human cognition. This is a writing intensive course with weekly lectures and seminar style discussion of primary sources. Students will be required to write weekly responses to readings and a term paper.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bedny, Marina
  • Room: Smokler Center 213
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO, BEHB-BIOBEH, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST

Real World Human Data: Analysis & Visualization
AS.200.329 (01)

Experiments in human cognition typically involve careful manipulation and control of variables in order to answer specific questions about the mind or brain. However, digital devices now provide an ocean of incidental human data: information collected continuously about our behavior and physiological states as we go about our lives. These incidental datasets are often large and noisy, and pose different analysis and visualization challenges from more traditional manipulated experiments. In this course students will learn computational tools and qualitative approaches for exploring, visualizing and interpreting large human data. The course emphasizes computer-based analysis of open-source human behavioral and neuroimaging datasets. Analyses will be conducted in MATLAB. Instructor will grant approval as long as you have previous programming experience (roughly equivalent to material covered in an introductory-level programming course). Self-taught or real-world experience can be applicable in lieu of previous formal classroom instruction.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Chen, Janice
  • Room: Ames 217
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/19
  • PosTag(s): COGS-COMPCG, COGS-NEURO, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, BEHB-BIOBEH

Careers in Psychology - Sophomore
AS.200.402 (01)

An introduction to the varied career paths offered across the field of psychology, hosting a diverse representation of speakers from various Johns Hopkins institutions and the local Baltimore community.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Roberts Fox, Heather
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Careers in Psychology - Juniors & Seniors
AS.200.403 (01)

An introduction to the varied career paths offered across the field of psychology, hosting a diverse representation of speakers from various Johns Hopkins institutions and the local Baltimore community.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 6:00PM - 7:30PM
  • Instructor: Roberts Fox, Heather
  • Room: Ames 234
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/30
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Occupational Health Psychology
AS.200.388 (01)

Occupational Health Psychology (OHP) concerns the application of psychology to improving the quality of work life, and to protecting and promoting the safety, satisfaction, health, and well-being of workers. This course will consider a broad range of topics in OHP including the role of work on well-being, job stress and burnout, diversity and work, safety climate, work-family balance, conflict, and counterproductive work behaviors. The emphasis will be on drawing connections between OHP theory and OHP practice and at the relationship between individual and organizational health and well-being. This class should be of interest to students interested in industrial/organizational psychology, social psychology, health psychology, clinical psychology, human factors, public health, preventive medicine, and industrial engineering.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Roberts Fox, Heather
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Quantitative Methods for Brain Sciences
AS.200.659 (01)

Focus on frequently-used quantitative methods used in the study of brain sciences, including gaining conceptual understanding of techniques, analysis and summarization of data, extracting the process underlying a data set, explaining data as a function of variables, data visualization, etc. Enrollment is limited to undergraduate seniors and graduate students with instructor approval. Recommended Course Background: Probability & Statistics, Linear Algebra, MATLAB programming.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MF 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Mysore, Shreesh Pranesh
  • Room: Krieger 110
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/25
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-CP

Design & Analysis for Experimental Psychology
AS.200.201 (06)

The goal of this course is to expose you to the processes of data collection, analysis, and dissemination in psychology. This course is the follow-up to “Research Methods in Experimental Psychology,” and therefore will draw on the methodological principles and practices covered in the Fall semester. This course will cover a wide array of analytical techniques (i.e., statistics) that you will apply to data collected as part of a semester-long group research project. The course will also include extensive coverage of the R programming language for use in data management, analysis, and visualization. With your group members, you will collect primary research data, carry out appropriate statistical tests, compose individual research manuscripts, and collectively present a poster at an on-campus research symposium. In combination with the Fall course, this class will serve as strong preparation for those considering honors theses, joining research labs at Homewood and/or JHMI, conducting independent research projects, and ultimately pursuing careers/graduate work in experimental psychology.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 10:00AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Krieger 205
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Neuroethology
AS.200.377 (01)

A comparative and evolutionary approach to understanding the neural underpinnings of biologically relevant behaviors in vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Enrollment limited to Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors or by instructor approval. Recommended Course Background: AS.200.141

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Sterbing-d'angelo, Susanne
  • Room: Bloomberg 176
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): NEUR-ST, BEHB-BIOBEH

Human Sexual Orientation
AS.290.420 (01)

This course will examine the historical and current theories of sexual orientation and sexual variation development by examining the biological, psychological and social contributing factors that influence the development of sexual orientations and variations along with treatment and modification of problematic sexual behaviors. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Students may enroll in both AS.200.204 and AS.290.420, but cannot do so in the same semester. Enrollment is limited to Senior Majors & Minors in Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychology; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Kraft, Chris S
  • Room: Ames 218
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-SOCSCI

Advanced Research Design and Analysis
AS.200.658 (01)

Second half of graduate statistics sequence, covering complex research design and analysis. Recommended Course Background: AS.200.657. Enrollment limited to seniors by instructor approval and graduate students.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Bowen, Jeffrey D
  • Room: Krieger 110
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 16/19
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.200.141 (01)Foundations of Brain, Behavior and CognitionTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMSmith, Dani RMudd 26COGS-NEURO, COGS-COGPSY
AS.200.159 (01)Freshmen Seminar: Evolutionary PsychologyT 2:00PM - 2:50PMEgeth, Howard EAmes 217
AS.050.339 (01)Cognitive DevelopmentTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMYarmolinskaya, Julia SKrieger 300BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO
AS.050.358 (01)Language & ThoughtW 1:30PM - 4:00PMLandau, BarbaraKrieger 134ACOGS-LING, COGS-COGPSY
AS.200.110 (01)Introduction to Cognitive PsychologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMFlombaum, JonathanHodson 110COGS-COGPSY
AS.200.133 (01)Introduction to Social PsychologyMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDrigotas, Stephen MHodson 110GECS-SOCSCI
AS.200.201 (01)Design & Analysis for Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DKrieger 205
AS.200.201 (03)Design & Analysis for Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 2:00PM - 3:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DKrieger 205
AS.200.201 (02)Design & Analysis for Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 12:00PM - 1:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DKrieger 205
AS.080.304 (01)Neuroscience Learning and MemoryTTh 4:30PM - 5:45PMBakker, ArnoldHodson 311NEUR-ST, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CM, BIOL-UL, COGS-NEURO, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.200.201 (04)Design & Analysis for Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 2:00PM - 3:45PMBowen, Jeffrey DKrieger 205
AS.200.212 (01)Abnormal PsychologyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMPapadakis, Alison Moog AubrechtHodson 110
AS.200.305 (01)Advanced Seminar in Forensic PsychologyT 4:00PM - 6:20PMHowe, Chelsea JillianAmes 217PSYC-SEM
AS.200.301 (01)History Of PsychologyTh 4:30PM - 7:00PMHofer, Paul JeffreyAmes 217PSYC-SEM
AS.200.321 (01)Child and Adolescent PsychopathologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPapadakis, Alison Moog AubrechtKrieger 180BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.304 (01)Neuroscience of Decision MakingTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMStuphorn, VeitBloomberg 276NEUR-ST, NEUR-CG, BEHB-BIOBEH, COGS-NEURO, PSYC-SEM
AS.200.307 (01)Medical PsychologyW 4:00PM - 6:20PMOstrander, RickKrieger 110PSYC-SEM
AS.200.317 (01)Interpersonal RelationsMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMDrigotas, Stephen MGilman 400BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.201 (05)Design & Analysis for Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 10:00AM - 11:45AMBowen, Jeffrey DKrieger 205
AS.200.204 (01)Human SexualityW 1:30PM - 4:00PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.344 (01)Behavioral EndocrinologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMPorth-Bohn, Kirsten MKrieger 170NEUR-ST, NEUR-CM, BEHB-BIOBEH, BIOL-UL
AS.200.401 (01)Careers in Psychology -FreshmanT 6:00PM - 7:30PMRoberts Fox, HeatherAmes 234
AS.200.370 (01)Functional Human NeuroanatomyWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMCourtney-Faruqee, SusanAmes 234COGS-NEURO, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.200.385 (01)Mind, Brain & ExperienceT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBedny, MarinaSmokler Center 213COGS-COGPSY, COGS-NEURO, BEHB-BIOBEH, NEUR-CG, NEUR-ST
AS.200.329 (01)Real World Human Data: Analysis & VisualizationTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMChen, JaniceAmes 217COGS-COMPCG, COGS-NEURO, NEUR-CG, NEUR-CP, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.200.402 (01)Careers in Psychology - SophomoreT 6:00PM - 7:30PMRoberts Fox, HeatherAmes 234
AS.200.403 (01)Careers in Psychology - Juniors & SeniorsT 6:00PM - 7:30PMRoberts Fox, HeatherAmes 234
AS.200.388 (01)Occupational Health PsychologyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMRoberts Fox, HeatherKrieger 302
AS.200.659 (01)Quantitative Methods for Brain SciencesMF 12:00PM - 1:15PMMysore, Shreesh PraneshKrieger 110NEUR-CP
AS.200.201 (06)Design & Analysis for Experimental PsychologyM 3:00PM - 4:45PM, W 10:00AM - 11:45AMBowen, Jeffrey DKrieger 205
AS.200.377 (01)NeuroethologyTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMSterbing-d'angelo, SusanneBloomberg 176NEUR-ST, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.290.420 (01)Human Sexual OrientationW 4:00PM - 6:30PMKraft, Chris SAmes 218BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.200.658 (01)Advanced Research Design and AnalysisT 1:30PM - 4:00PMBowen, Jeffrey DKrieger 110